Citroen AMI ONE to debut at Geneva

Citroen has previewed a new pure-electric city car, with the AMI ONE two-seater concept due to be launched at the Geneva Motor Show next month.

At 2.5 metres long, 1.5 metres high, and 1.5 metres wide, the Citroen is so compact that it actually fits in to quadricycle regulations - like Renault's Twizy. The AMI ONE has a range of 62 miles and a top speed of just 28 mph, with a turning circle of 8 metres and weight kept down to just 425 kg.

The battery sits in the floor of the car, powering an electric motor that drives the rear wheels. No battery size is available, but considering the short range and the fact that Citroen says it will only take two hours for a full charge, it's likely to be around 6 kWh.

It has been designed on the same principles as the classic 2CV, which was designed to be a car for rural French drivers. This time around, the focus on mobility has been switched to urban areas, and those that just want to get around, rather than own and drive a car.

As such, the AMI ONE has a number of ownership methods, with the vehicle able to be rented for just five minutes, looked after for five months, or leased for five years - with car sharing, rental, and purchase covering all points in between.

Citroen AMI ONE

Smartphones play a key part in the AMI ONE's usage, with a digital key allowing access and use of the Citroen. It also replaces an infotainment screen, with apps to cover rental, charging, trip planning and navigation, and entertainment.

Doors lock and unlock by scanning a QR code on the door handles, before placing the phone in a wireless charging dock to enable use of apps via the head-up display.

Apart from a five-inch digital display for essential information such as speed, everything else is housed in a cylinder in the centre of the dash, with start button, hazard lights button, gear selector, and Bluetooth speaker.

Although not as pared back as the 2CV, there are clear signs that one of Citroen's most famous models has been a great influence with the AMI ONE. One such touch is the fact that the doors are identical, resulting in different opening directions. The driver's side (on left-hand drive cars at least) are rear opening for easier access to the rear compartments, while the passenger door is front opening.

The front and rear bumpers share components too, assembled 'in an inverted manner', identical bumpers, wings, rocker panels, running lights, and parts making up the door mirrors and handles mean many of the elements can simply be reversed to build. This not only significantly reduces manufacturing costs, it should also mean repair bills are cheaper too.

Although a concept currently, Citroen could look to put a model like the AMI ONE into production within the next few years. Further details will be available at the model's launch in Geneva on 5th March.

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Chris Lilly

Author:Chris Lilly
Date Updated:19th Feb 2019

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